COO Systems and Policy 2020-2021
Organizations and individual applicants can apply.
Opens Aug 5 2019 08:00 AM (PDT)
Deadline Sep 16 2019 05:00 PM (PDT)
Description

OVERVIEW

Thank you for your interest in the Communities of Opportunity Systems and Policy Change Grants.  This RFP invites proposals from community-led and community-engaged efforts to transform systems and policies for stronger community connections, economic opportunity, better health, and/or housing that will decrease and/or prevent continued inequity in communities of color in King County.

Communities of Opportunity (COO) is announcing its 2020-2021, multi-year systems and policy change grant cycle. While this funding opportunity allows for two years of funding, COO acknowledges that policy work takes significant time. We recognize that bold policy outcomes may not be achieved within the two year timeframe, and encourage and welcome applications for efforts that need to continue past this timeframe.
 

WHAT WE SEEK TO SUPPORT

  • Community-based efforts based in and led by people most impacted by inequity focused on changing policies, rules, systems or regulations in order to reduce and eliminate inequity.
  • Efforts that demonstrate deep community leadership in the identification of issues and development of solutions.
  • Efforts that demonstrate knowledge of the practices, policies, rules, systems or regulations they seek to change.
  • COO investments are directed to communities where there are the greatest inequities. COO uses a racial equity and social justice lens in developing strategies to impact community connections, economic opportunity, health and housing.
  • Efforts to reduce inequity through systems and policy change. Efforts can be targeted at a wide variety of institutions including but not limited to; government, regulatory agencies, schools and post-secondary institutions, hospitals and health care delivery systems, and places of employment.

WHO SHOULD APPLY

  • Organizations or coalitions that are led by and for the community in which the proposed grant work takes place.
  • Organizations or coalitions that center racial equity in their work and approach.
  • Organizations or coalitions with strong relationships and trust in the community.
  • Organizations seeking to make policy change at the neighborhood, city, county or state level.
  • All applicants must have 501(c)(3) nonprofit status or have a fiscal sponsor that qualifies as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.
  • All applicants must be based within the state of Washington.
  • Organizations or coalitions must demonstrate the impact of their work in King County.
  • Organizations or coalitions that are currently receiving funding or participating through other COO strategy areas, including Cultural and Place-based community partnerships, are eligible to apply, providing their proposal meets the criteria in this RFP.


HOW WE MAKE DECISIONS

  • Applications will be reviewed by a review committee made up of COO (Seattle Foundation and King County) staff and community reviewers. The review committee will make recommendations to the COO Governance Group for final approval on funding decisions.
  • COO acknowledges that policy work takes time and that the success of policy initiatives is often dependent on external forces, given this:
    • We will prioritize efforts focused on building a successful movement for racial equity over efforts that focus only on policy wins.
    • We will not prioritize efforts that will be achieved in the short-term over those that will take years to build. We encourage applicants to build workplans and timelines that realistically represent the vision for their work.
  • COO will support efforts that are focused on building long-term power in identified communities. In our review, we will prioritize power-building over work that builds a policy without empowering the community. We will prioritize communities of color, native and indigenous communities, and organizations working at the intersections of racial justice and other inequities.
  • We will prioritize organizations who demonstrate ability to execute their plans in the grant timeframe.  
  • COO is interested in meeting applicant organizations where they are in the policy process and will not give preference to organizations who are ‘further’ along a process.
  • We will prioritize funding organizations who uplift the leadership of community.
  • COO investments are directed to communities where there are the greatest inequities. COO uses a racial equity and social justice lens in developing strategies to impact community connections, economic opportunity, health and housing.

FUNDING AMOUNT AND LENGTH

Amount: COO has $2,000,000 available annually, from 2020-2021.  Awards may be extended for a third year, pending the allocation of COO funding in subsequent years.  

An organization applying on its own behalf may receive up to $100,000 per year. Applicants applying as a coalition with other organizations may receive up to $200,000 per year.

Multi-year Funding: COO will make multi-year funding awards to support activities taking place January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2021. Awards may be extended for an additional 12 months, pending funding availability and grant award performance.

Funding Requirements: Detailed terms of grant reporting will be finalized with selected grantees and reflected in final grant agreements, but will include at a minimum twice yearly grant updates. Selected grantees will also have access to capacity building resources.


COMMUNITY-IDENTIFIED RESULTS AREAS

Through a community-led planning process, COO defined four intersecting priority areas for our work: quality affordable housing for all, the right to be healthy, increased economic opportunity, and strengthened connection to community.  To ensure COO funding can catalyze the movement for racial justice, our funding priorities are identified by people who live and work in the community.

Between 2018 and 2019, COO convened community stakeholders in a cohort to develop a policy agenda. These leaders represented over 30 community-based organizations across a wide spectrum of ethnic and geographic communities within King County. By sharing their experience and expertise, the stakeholder cohort identified a set of systems and policy recommendations to close racial and geographic disparities in areas of housing, economic opportunity, health, and community connection.

Our funding will prioritize proposals aligned with the following vision statements and priorities from the result areas. Examples are provided to give guidance on policies or practices that are aligned with the vision as defined by the community. Many policies may have impacts that intersect with more than one result area and COO recommends organizations discuss multiple benefits of proposals wherever possible and relevant.


HOUSING

In order to sustainably, and with dignity, house the growing number of housing-insecure people in the region, we must build strategies for both the immediate need and the long-term needs to address the systems that created our current crisis.


ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY

Real changes in economic systems that prioritize the values of communities and imagine success as shared, must occur. We need solutions for tomorrow, as well as today, that open doors for good jobs at living wages and in healthy conditions that allow community members to work and thrive in the places they live.


HEALTH

Health care delivery systems and the social determinants of health are deeply impacted by racism and colonialism, creating conditions where race and place are predictive of health outcomes. Sustainable, holistic, and culturally relevant care - designed by and for those most impacted - is vital to addressing health disparities. Systems and policy work in health includes addressing social determinants of health, as well as changes to institutions, like hospitals or schools.


COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

Building the capacity for disparate communities, organizations and public institutions to understand distinct challenges and shared aspirations is difficult work. Moving forward in solidarity while acknowledging privilege and unequal relationships between partners remains crucial for true systems change. We need structures that simultaneously reinforce self-determination while developing deeper, accountable relationships between communities, government, and private partners.


EXAMPLES OF POLICY PRIORITiES IDENTIFIED BY THE SYSTEMS AND POLICY COHORT

We need to create change that:

  • Deepens community participation in civic activities and builds long-term power.
  • Preserves and strengthens relationships in community, especially when strengthened relationships guard against displacement and disruption in the community.  
  • Builds increased collaboration between communities and institutions through methods that give community decision-making power.
  • Incentivizes community land ownership.
  • Protects renters from eviction.
  • Builds strategies to address homelessness; led by and centering communities most impacted by homelessness, especially black and indigenous communities.  
  • Expands inclusionary zoning policies and practices in areas of the region experiencing displacement.
  • Develops and supports strategies for worker-owned cooperative businesses that generate revenue for low-income communities and communities of color.
  • Addresses the root cause of underfunded programs through improving the Washington state tax code.
  • Prevents the displacement of small businesses in low-income, immigrant and people of color communities.
  • Ensures means tests for social services align with the high cost of living in our region.
  • Expands data sovereignty initiatives to ensure communities have the ability to own and manage data connected with their community.
  • Creates learning partnerships between health institutions and community-based organizations that form the basis for institutional change inside health systems.
  • Increases the availability of healthy, low cost, fresh foods for low-income residents and students.


FUNDING & ALLOWABLE ACTIVITIES

We recognize provision of stipends and direct services  can serve as a point of contact and an initial exposure to organizing and systems change work. We also recognize the challenges inherent in working on long-term systems change while foregoing immediate needs that can be met through immediate support. Simultaneously, philanthropy historically has underinvested in critical organizing and systems change work. The core purpose of the COO Systems and Policy work is to support the organizing, advocacy, research and policy work needed to make a more just society. Organizations are encouraged to develop proposals that respect the intellectual property, time value and other resource costs of doing community-based work as appropriate for the individual organization or coalition. This includes stipends for participant time, travel or childcare as well as staff time to help community members navigate systems and receive social supports.

Lobbying limitations: The funding supporting Communities of Opportunity is a blend of philanthropic and public funds. COO systems and policy change grants can support limited lobbying through the use of philanthropic dollars. Local government funds have specific restrictions on the use of funds to lobby legislators and the public. In the proposal below, please identify any actions that include lobbying activities. Political activity is a prohibited use of COO funds: None of the funds, materials, property, or services provided directly or indirectly with COO funds shall be used for any partisan political activity or to further the election or defeat of any candidate for public office.

SYSTEMS & POLICY PROCESS

We recognize that policy change work is not linear and that many times each of the phases may happen concurrently. COO is interested in meeting applicant organizations where they are in the policy process and will not give preference to organizations who are ‘further’ on the spectrum. Your self-selection using Table 1 below will help COO reviewers understand where your work is in in the policy and systems change process.

You will be asked to self-identify where you are in the development of your systems and policy change project when you access the online application - Listen, Develop, Organize or Act. The chart below will also be available within the application.


Listen
Develop

Organize

Act

Primary Purpose

Understanding community priorities

Building and deepening relationships with community

Creation of the community-led solutions

Deepening community awareness

Preparing key partners and community members to act

Expanding the relationship base

Change the existing policy, practice, or system

Mobilizing community

Example Activities

Community forums, community interviews, community meetings,  door knocking, community-based research
Exploration and identification of root causes  product development and material development targeted at policymakers
Coalition building, developing and seeding new relationships, community forums
Advocacy campaigns, submitting public comment, media campaigns, working to pass legislation, seeing through the implementation of a recently passed policy or systems change

Table 1. Policy Process


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPECTRUM


INFORM
CONSULT
INVOLVE
COLLABORATE
COMMUNITY DIRECTED
Community Participation Goal
To provide the community with balanced factual and culturally appropriate information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and solutions
To obtain community feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions
To work directly with communities throughout the process to ensure that community issues and concerns are consistently understood and considered
To partner with communities in each aspect of the decision including the initial development of solutions and alternatives
To place final decision-making in the hands of the community
Message to the Community
We will keep you informed, we will hear directly from people most impacted by the challenge.
We will keep you informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and provide feedback on how community input influenced decisions.
We will work collectively to ensure community concerns are directly reflected in the work and keep the community informed.
We will look to the community for advice and innovation on creating solutions. Community advice and innovations will be included to the maximum extent possible.
We will move forward with what the community decides.

Table 2. Community Engagement Spectrum. Adopted from King County Continuum of Engagement


COO seeks to support community leadership and deep community engagement in systems and policy change efforts. The above spectrum of community engagement is provided as an example to provide a framework for the different depths of community engagement alongside examples of each type. As you respond to the questions below regarding community involvement, please use this language of Inform – Community Directed to describe the type of community engagement your effort is engaged in. Note that the examples are not exhaustive and you should not feel it necessary to restrict your tools to those listed above.

Taking your proposed project as a whole, you will be asked on the online application where you would place your work on the engagement spectrum - Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, Community Directs. This chart will also be available within the application.  


PROPOSAL NARRATIVE QUESTIONS

PAGE LIMITS

For the purpose of this grant, total responses should not exceed 6 pages single spaced text.

To minimize potential loss of your data, we strongly recommend that you first fill out your answers on the Word document version of the form in case functionality issues arise with SurveyMonkey Apply. After completing your answers on the Word document, please copy and paste your answers onto this SurveyMonkey form. As you fill out the SurveyMonkey form, you may stop, save answers, and return at a later time if you are unable to complete it in one sitting. You may use whatever format allows you to best convey your responses (i.e. bullet points or paragraphs).

CHALLENGE STATEMENT

  1. Challenge - Describe the current challenge in the community as it exists now. Please be specific about how the challenge relates to one or more of the result areas and priorities listed in the community identified results area above. Include information about who is impacted by the challenge and how they participated in identifying the challenge.
  2. Base – Who is the community supporting your proposed work?
  3. Target/Decision Maker – Where does the authority lie to make the change you wish to see? This may be a governmental agency, elected body, community institution or something else.
  4. Landscape Analysis – Describe the current power structure around the challenge. Be clear about who the key players are, who is already on your side and who will need to be moved in order for your advocacy to be successful.

PROPOSED APPROACH

5. How will your organization/coalition work to change the challenge identified in the previous section?

6. How does your work relate to or move forward the goals described in the four results areas? You may choose one or more results areas.  

7. What tactics will you deploy to be successful? Note if any of your tactics include lobbying.

8. Sometimes shifts in organizational, cultural or political environment can stop, slow down or accelerate progress to your goals. Looking ahead over the next two years, what potential shifts might occur in the landscape that could affect your success? How will your organization/coalition adapt to those shifts to be successful?

9. Where does this proposed work sit in the broader context of your organization/coalition’s work? How is this related to or different from other programs your organization or your coalition partners run currently or has run in the past?

ANTICIPATED RESULTS

10. What outcomes will you achieve at the end of the two year grant period?

  • Policy and systems:
  • Community or power structure:

11. What milestones/short term goals for success will you achieve along the way?  


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP

12. What are the community strengths that make this work possible?

13. How is the community engaged in this work? How will they be engaged over the course of the grant funds?

14. What organizations are your strongest allies?


QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE

15.  What previous experience has prepared you to do this work? Be specific to experience collaborating with your base community and with organizing, advocacy and policy change.

16. What are the key relationships needed for this grant? List those relationships as (1) planned, (2) developing or (3) strong.


SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL

PROPOSAL & ATTACHMENTS

  • Online application
  • Workplan of activities associated with your approach and anticipated results (please use this template)
  • Board and Staff Diversity Document  (please use this template)
  • Current fiscal year organizational operating budget
  • Upload Proposed Project Budget
  • Most recent IRS Form 990 (for your organization or fiscal sponsor)
  • Audited financial statements (if available)


Information Sessions - RSVP is strongly encouraged

August 15 – RSVP Here
10:00 a.m. -11:30 a.m.
Seattle Foundation,
1601 5th Ave, 19th Floor
Light Refreshments Served

August 19 – RSVP Here
6:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m.
Des Moines Library, Meeting Room
21620 11th Avenue South
Des Moines, WA 98198
Dinner will be served

August 20 – RSVP Here
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Webinar

Apply

COO Systems and Policy 2020-2021


OVERVIEW

Thank you for your interest in the Communities of Opportunity Systems and Policy Change Grants.  This RFP invites proposals from community-led and community-engaged efforts to transform systems and policies for stronger community connections, economic opportunity, better health, and/or housing that will decrease and/or prevent continued inequity in communities of color in King County.

Communities of Opportunity (COO) is announcing its 2020-2021, multi-year systems and policy change grant cycle. While this funding opportunity allows for two years of funding, COO acknowledges that policy work takes significant time. We recognize that bold policy outcomes may not be achieved within the two year timeframe, and encourage and welcome applications for efforts that need to continue past this timeframe.
 

WHAT WE SEEK TO SUPPORT

  • Community-based efforts based in and led by people most impacted by inequity focused on changing policies, rules, systems or regulations in order to reduce and eliminate inequity.
  • Efforts that demonstrate deep community leadership in the identification of issues and development of solutions.
  • Efforts that demonstrate knowledge of the practices, policies, rules, systems or regulations they seek to change.
  • COO investments are directed to communities where there are the greatest inequities. COO uses a racial equity and social justice lens in developing strategies to impact community connections, economic opportunity, health and housing.
  • Efforts to reduce inequity through systems and policy change. Efforts can be targeted at a wide variety of institutions including but not limited to; government, regulatory agencies, schools and post-secondary institutions, hospitals and health care delivery systems, and places of employment.

WHO SHOULD APPLY

  • Organizations or coalitions that are led by and for the community in which the proposed grant work takes place.
  • Organizations or coalitions that center racial equity in their work and approach.
  • Organizations or coalitions with strong relationships and trust in the community.
  • Organizations seeking to make policy change at the neighborhood, city, county or state level.
  • All applicants must have 501(c)(3) nonprofit status or have a fiscal sponsor that qualifies as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.
  • All applicants must be based within the state of Washington.
  • Organizations or coalitions must demonstrate the impact of their work in King County.
  • Organizations or coalitions that are currently receiving funding or participating through other COO strategy areas, including Cultural and Place-based community partnerships, are eligible to apply, providing their proposal meets the criteria in this RFP.


HOW WE MAKE DECISIONS

  • Applications will be reviewed by a review committee made up of COO (Seattle Foundation and King County) staff and community reviewers. The review committee will make recommendations to the COO Governance Group for final approval on funding decisions.
  • COO acknowledges that policy work takes time and that the success of policy initiatives is often dependent on external forces, given this:
    • We will prioritize efforts focused on building a successful movement for racial equity over efforts that focus only on policy wins.
    • We will not prioritize efforts that will be achieved in the short-term over those that will take years to build. We encourage applicants to build workplans and timelines that realistically represent the vision for their work.
  • COO will support efforts that are focused on building long-term power in identified communities. In our review, we will prioritize power-building over work that builds a policy without empowering the community. We will prioritize communities of color, native and indigenous communities, and organizations working at the intersections of racial justice and other inequities.
  • We will prioritize organizations who demonstrate ability to execute their plans in the grant timeframe.  
  • COO is interested in meeting applicant organizations where they are in the policy process and will not give preference to organizations who are ‘further’ along a process.
  • We will prioritize funding organizations who uplift the leadership of community.
  • COO investments are directed to communities where there are the greatest inequities. COO uses a racial equity and social justice lens in developing strategies to impact community connections, economic opportunity, health and housing.

FUNDING AMOUNT AND LENGTH

Amount: COO has $2,000,000 available annually, from 2020-2021.  Awards may be extended for a third year, pending the allocation of COO funding in subsequent years.  

An organization applying on its own behalf may receive up to $100,000 per year. Applicants applying as a coalition with other organizations may receive up to $200,000 per year.

Multi-year Funding: COO will make multi-year funding awards to support activities taking place January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2021. Awards may be extended for an additional 12 months, pending funding availability and grant award performance.

Funding Requirements: Detailed terms of grant reporting will be finalized with selected grantees and reflected in final grant agreements, but will include at a minimum twice yearly grant updates. Selected grantees will also have access to capacity building resources.


COMMUNITY-IDENTIFIED RESULTS AREAS

Through a community-led planning process, COO defined four intersecting priority areas for our work: quality affordable housing for all, the right to be healthy, increased economic opportunity, and strengthened connection to community.  To ensure COO funding can catalyze the movement for racial justice, our funding priorities are identified by people who live and work in the community.

Between 2018 and 2019, COO convened community stakeholders in a cohort to develop a policy agenda. These leaders represented over 30 community-based organizations across a wide spectrum of ethnic and geographic communities within King County. By sharing their experience and expertise, the stakeholder cohort identified a set of systems and policy recommendations to close racial and geographic disparities in areas of housing, economic opportunity, health, and community connection.

Our funding will prioritize proposals aligned with the following vision statements and priorities from the result areas. Examples are provided to give guidance on policies or practices that are aligned with the vision as defined by the community. Many policies may have impacts that intersect with more than one result area and COO recommends organizations discuss multiple benefits of proposals wherever possible and relevant.


HOUSING

In order to sustainably, and with dignity, house the growing number of housing-insecure people in the region, we must build strategies for both the immediate need and the long-term needs to address the systems that created our current crisis.


ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY

Real changes in economic systems that prioritize the values of communities and imagine success as shared, must occur. We need solutions for tomorrow, as well as today, that open doors for good jobs at living wages and in healthy conditions that allow community members to work and thrive in the places they live.


HEALTH

Health care delivery systems and the social determinants of health are deeply impacted by racism and colonialism, creating conditions where race and place are predictive of health outcomes. Sustainable, holistic, and culturally relevant care - designed by and for those most impacted - is vital to addressing health disparities. Systems and policy work in health includes addressing social determinants of health, as well as changes to institutions, like hospitals or schools.


COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

Building the capacity for disparate communities, organizations and public institutions to understand distinct challenges and shared aspirations is difficult work. Moving forward in solidarity while acknowledging privilege and unequal relationships between partners remains crucial for true systems change. We need structures that simultaneously reinforce self-determination while developing deeper, accountable relationships between communities, government, and private partners.


EXAMPLES OF POLICY PRIORITiES IDENTIFIED BY THE SYSTEMS AND POLICY COHORT

We need to create change that:

  • Deepens community participation in civic activities and builds long-term power.
  • Preserves and strengthens relationships in community, especially when strengthened relationships guard against displacement and disruption in the community.  
  • Builds increased collaboration between communities and institutions through methods that give community decision-making power.
  • Incentivizes community land ownership.
  • Protects renters from eviction.
  • Builds strategies to address homelessness; led by and centering communities most impacted by homelessness, especially black and indigenous communities.  
  • Expands inclusionary zoning policies and practices in areas of the region experiencing displacement.
  • Develops and supports strategies for worker-owned cooperative businesses that generate revenue for low-income communities and communities of color.
  • Addresses the root cause of underfunded programs through improving the Washington state tax code.
  • Prevents the displacement of small businesses in low-income, immigrant and people of color communities.
  • Ensures means tests for social services align with the high cost of living in our region.
  • Expands data sovereignty initiatives to ensure communities have the ability to own and manage data connected with their community.
  • Creates learning partnerships between health institutions and community-based organizations that form the basis for institutional change inside health systems.
  • Increases the availability of healthy, low cost, fresh foods for low-income residents and students.


FUNDING & ALLOWABLE ACTIVITIES

We recognize provision of stipends and direct services  can serve as a point of contact and an initial exposure to organizing and systems change work. We also recognize the challenges inherent in working on long-term systems change while foregoing immediate needs that can be met through immediate support. Simultaneously, philanthropy historically has underinvested in critical organizing and systems change work. The core purpose of the COO Systems and Policy work is to support the organizing, advocacy, research and policy work needed to make a more just society. Organizations are encouraged to develop proposals that respect the intellectual property, time value and other resource costs of doing community-based work as appropriate for the individual organization or coalition. This includes stipends for participant time, travel or childcare as well as staff time to help community members navigate systems and receive social supports.

Lobbying limitations: The funding supporting Communities of Opportunity is a blend of philanthropic and public funds. COO systems and policy change grants can support limited lobbying through the use of philanthropic dollars. Local government funds have specific restrictions on the use of funds to lobby legislators and the public. In the proposal below, please identify any actions that include lobbying activities. Political activity is a prohibited use of COO funds: None of the funds, materials, property, or services provided directly or indirectly with COO funds shall be used for any partisan political activity or to further the election or defeat of any candidate for public office.

SYSTEMS & POLICY PROCESS

We recognize that policy change work is not linear and that many times each of the phases may happen concurrently. COO is interested in meeting applicant organizations where they are in the policy process and will not give preference to organizations who are ‘further’ on the spectrum. Your self-selection using Table 1 below will help COO reviewers understand where your work is in in the policy and systems change process.

You will be asked to self-identify where you are in the development of your systems and policy change project when you access the online application - Listen, Develop, Organize or Act. The chart below will also be available within the application.


Listen
Develop

Organize

Act

Primary Purpose

Understanding community priorities

Building and deepening relationships with community

Creation of the community-led solutions

Deepening community awareness

Preparing key partners and community members to act

Expanding the relationship base

Change the existing policy, practice, or system

Mobilizing community

Example Activities

Community forums, community interviews, community meetings,  door knocking, community-based research
Exploration and identification of root causes  product development and material development targeted at policymakers
Coalition building, developing and seeding new relationships, community forums
Advocacy campaigns, submitting public comment, media campaigns, working to pass legislation, seeing through the implementation of a recently passed policy or systems change

Table 1. Policy Process


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPECTRUM


INFORM
CONSULT
INVOLVE
COLLABORATE
COMMUNITY DIRECTED
Community Participation Goal
To provide the community with balanced factual and culturally appropriate information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and solutions
To obtain community feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions
To work directly with communities throughout the process to ensure that community issues and concerns are consistently understood and considered
To partner with communities in each aspect of the decision including the initial development of solutions and alternatives
To place final decision-making in the hands of the community
Message to the Community
We will keep you informed, we will hear directly from people most impacted by the challenge.
We will keep you informed, listen to and acknowledge concerns and provide feedback on how community input influenced decisions.
We will work collectively to ensure community concerns are directly reflected in the work and keep the community informed.
We will look to the community for advice and innovation on creating solutions. Community advice and innovations will be included to the maximum extent possible.
We will move forward with what the community decides.

Table 2. Community Engagement Spectrum. Adopted from King County Continuum of Engagement


COO seeks to support community leadership and deep community engagement in systems and policy change efforts. The above spectrum of community engagement is provided as an example to provide a framework for the different depths of community engagement alongside examples of each type. As you respond to the questions below regarding community involvement, please use this language of Inform – Community Directed to describe the type of community engagement your effort is engaged in. Note that the examples are not exhaustive and you should not feel it necessary to restrict your tools to those listed above.

Taking your proposed project as a whole, you will be asked on the online application where you would place your work on the engagement spectrum - Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, Community Directs. This chart will also be available within the application.  


PROPOSAL NARRATIVE QUESTIONS

PAGE LIMITS

For the purpose of this grant, total responses should not exceed 6 pages single spaced text.

To minimize potential loss of your data, we strongly recommend that you first fill out your answers on the Word document version of the form in case functionality issues arise with SurveyMonkey Apply. After completing your answers on the Word document, please copy and paste your answers onto this SurveyMonkey form. As you fill out the SurveyMonkey form, you may stop, save answers, and return at a later time if you are unable to complete it in one sitting. You may use whatever format allows you to best convey your responses (i.e. bullet points or paragraphs).

CHALLENGE STATEMENT

  1. Challenge - Describe the current challenge in the community as it exists now. Please be specific about how the challenge relates to one or more of the result areas and priorities listed in the community identified results area above. Include information about who is impacted by the challenge and how they participated in identifying the challenge.
  2. Base – Who is the community supporting your proposed work?
  3. Target/Decision Maker – Where does the authority lie to make the change you wish to see? This may be a governmental agency, elected body, community institution or something else.
  4. Landscape Analysis – Describe the current power structure around the challenge. Be clear about who the key players are, who is already on your side and who will need to be moved in order for your advocacy to be successful.

PROPOSED APPROACH

5. How will your organization/coalition work to change the challenge identified in the previous section?

6. How does your work relate to or move forward the goals described in the four results areas? You may choose one or more results areas.  

7. What tactics will you deploy to be successful? Note if any of your tactics include lobbying.

8. Sometimes shifts in organizational, cultural or political environment can stop, slow down or accelerate progress to your goals. Looking ahead over the next two years, what potential shifts might occur in the landscape that could affect your success? How will your organization/coalition adapt to those shifts to be successful?

9. Where does this proposed work sit in the broader context of your organization/coalition’s work? How is this related to or different from other programs your organization or your coalition partners run currently or has run in the past?

ANTICIPATED RESULTS

10. What outcomes will you achieve at the end of the two year grant period?

  • Policy and systems:
  • Community or power structure:

11. What milestones/short term goals for success will you achieve along the way?  


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP

12. What are the community strengths that make this work possible?

13. How is the community engaged in this work? How will they be engaged over the course of the grant funds?

14. What organizations are your strongest allies?


QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE

15.  What previous experience has prepared you to do this work? Be specific to experience collaborating with your base community and with organizing, advocacy and policy change.

16. What are the key relationships needed for this grant? List those relationships as (1) planned, (2) developing or (3) strong.


SUBMITTING A PROPOSAL

PROPOSAL & ATTACHMENTS

  • Online application
  • Workplan of activities associated with your approach and anticipated results (please use this template)
  • Board and Staff Diversity Document  (please use this template)
  • Current fiscal year organizational operating budget
  • Upload Proposed Project Budget
  • Most recent IRS Form 990 (for your organization or fiscal sponsor)
  • Audited financial statements (if available)


Information Sessions - RSVP is strongly encouraged

August 15 – RSVP Here
10:00 a.m. -11:30 a.m.
Seattle Foundation,
1601 5th Ave, 19th Floor
Light Refreshments Served

August 19 – RSVP Here
6:00 p.m. -7:30 p.m.
Des Moines Library, Meeting Room
21620 11th Avenue South
Des Moines, WA 98198
Dinner will be served

August 20 – RSVP Here
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Webinar

Apply
Open to
Organizations and individual applicants can apply.
Opens
Aug 5 2019 08:00 AM (PDT)
Deadline
Sep 16 2019 05:00 PM (PDT)

Categories
Grant